Appreciating Cracks

There is a crack in everything.
That’s how the light gets in.
~Leonard Cohen

Yes, there has to be a crack for light to enter. This is one of my favourite quotes. Though I had read this quote long back I grasped it much later.

It was during a difficult phase in life; I understood this quote. There were challenges and obstacles in every sphere of my life. I went for long walks in the evening with my small daughter. Those walks helped us to smile.

On a particularly difficult day, we decided to take a new path. It would be a long way back home, but somehow it felt right. This was not a familiar route.

We passed few landmarks and suddenly stopped. There stood a lovely house all in ruins. It had been an elegant structure. Though unoccupied, for years, it had been maintained well.

My daughter approached the guard to find out. The house had been burnt in a fire accident. By the time help arrived it was late. Thankfully, there was no one inside. We asked the guard’s permission to go inside to look at the once beautiful garden.

The path was covered with charred pieces of wood, bricks and heaps of ash. I looked around strangely captivated by the havoc. My daughter had many questions. However, the futility of those questions made me sadder.

I sat on a flat stone while my daughter explored the gardens. Devoid of colour the landscape looked bleak. Grey, black and strange white were the only hues.

My eyes scanned thoroughly and I noticed something. Pulled by a strange force I ran towards it.

Yes, there was a crack for light to enter.

On the corner of an ash heap was a tiny leaf dancing on a thin stem. We knelt to observe.
Life hoped to live.

Tiny

Tiny After two Weeks

How interesting, to see some seed taking root in this barren place. How did a seed land and embedded itself? How did it sustain? There were no obvious answers, and yet I had found answers to my questions.

Yes, Life goes on to bloom in any circumstances. Somehow even my daughter understood this truth.
Perfection binds you, imperfection provides hope.

Cracks are required for letting the light pass. In periods of transition cracks are bound to appear. Transformation goes through disintegration. We just need to cherish hope in our hearts
Our journey back home was different. I felt optimistic and capable of facing the challenges ahead. That tiny seed transformed  my thoughts.

“Mama let’s come every day to meet ‘tiny’.”

My daughter suggested. And we came for about a month until the day we relocated to another place. By that time ‘Tiny’ had become a small plant.

Today that plant is a metaphor we refer when things are difficult. Remember ‘Tiny’ is all we have to say to smile and sing.
This post is for Indibloggers – Lookupstories
https://housing.com/lookup

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Freedom to Be

The Independence Day comes over again and our Tricolour freely soars in the August sky. It flutters and sways in the wind.

Flag2

This is how our life should flow through the winds of destiny. With all kinds of freedom, the freedom to be what you ‘are’ is extremely important. Today, I watch my daughter with a happy smile.  A confident eleven years old, comfortable in being whoever she is.

Few years back I remember she suddenly became an introvert, hesitant child. What exactly had triggered this was not obvious, though. As a mother, I helplessly watched her going into a shell.
I was aware this would require a lot of love, acceptance and patience. I did not want to hurt her in any way. The fragile emotions were delicate and precious.After introspecting, discussing and researching I decided to convey the message through a story.

She had always enjoyed bed-time story sessions. As a toddler she would often give me subjects to create a story around. These story sessions would continue until she fell asleep.
While conversing, I realised that she had been comparing herself with her friends.
This is a trap we fall into. No one can help us to find our unique abilities. That discovery solely depends on us.

I wrote a story of a sad peacock who thought he looked dull. This peacock waited for someone to help identify his strengths. A squirrel who became his true friend helped him discover his talent. The colours were a gift from his friends as a token of appreciation.
This story helped my daughter immensely. She would listen to it almost every day and slowly things changed.

Today, she is a cheerful well-adjusted child. She is aware of her strengths and comfortable with her weaknesses. This is the real freedom.

This story has been published by Mangoreader. It is award winning reading library. It is an amazing resource for kids, parents, teachers, readers, writers and artists. Digitally interactive stories enhance imagination and creativity.

I appreciate Artika Ranjan’s contribution in creating lovely illustrations for this story.

Do read and share this story with young readers.

The Peacock’s Secret

Peacock's Secret

Happy Independence Day !